READING

Cu Chi Adventure: A Day Trip to The Cu Chi Tunnels

Cu Chi Adventure: A Day Trip to The Cu Chi Tunnels

When tourists visit Ho Chi Minh City, the Cu Chi Tunnels are undoubtedly the most highly suggested attraction. Beyond the War Remnants Museum and The Reunification Palace, a visit to the Cu Chi Tunnels affords tourists a more hands-on way to experience the devastating war that took place in Vietnam over 40 years ago. By hands on, I mean to say, you literally get down on your hands and knees and crawl through the tunnels that were used by the Viet Cong to evade American forces. The network of tunnels stretch on for about 250 km and run up to 12 meters deep. Quite literally, you find yourself tunneling your way back through time.

Cu Chi Adventure Tunnels

A front door pick up!

Bright and early, at 7 am, the Onetrip guides from Team Christina’s came to pick up my two friends and me from my apartment.

Where’s the bus?” I asked.
What bus?” replied Tri.
You mean these?

He pointed to the three motorcycles next to us. HOLY MOLY. A trip to the Cu Chi via motorcycles! No wonder it was called the Cu Chi Adventure! I don’t know how that fact slipped by me but when I had booked this trip, it was at the behest of my two friends, Julie and Gavin, who were in town visiting. I wearily agreed to join the trip as it was Julie’s birthday that day and I wanted to maximize our time together. But a few months back, when I first arrived to HCMC, I did a half-day trip to the Cu Chi Tunnels that left me seriously disenchanted: all I remember was the gimmicky shooting range where AK-47s roared loudly and a goofy guide who claimed he was the ONLY survivor of the war. I was hoping to understand the war better but all I got out of the day was the romanticization of a gruesome war that laid waste on the land and its people.

Cu Chi Adventure Tunnels

Julie and her awesome guide Ben

Our guides Tri, Ben, and Binh presented us with these cool ethnic printed headbands that would later double as masks to filter out the pollution on the road. We then set off for our first destination: Bánh Mì Hà Nội breakfast . An hour later, we were on the boundaries of District 12 and soon entering the suburban district of Hóc Môn. Tri stopped to get me some com tam (broken rice) when I informed him of my gluten sensitivity. Dietary restrictions accommodated for the win! About 15 minutes later, we were at Dương Cầm Coffee Shop regrouping with my friends and meeting the rest of the entourage. Devika from NYC, a Malaysian couple named Michelle and Sam, and Grady, a Californian based in HCMC, completed our 7-person strong team. After our hearty breakfast of cafe sua da (iced coffee), banh mi, and the best dragon fruit I’ve ever tasted, we continued on.

Cu Chi Adventure Tunnels

The gang’s all here!

Our motorcade breezed through near empty streets, with the sun beating down on us. Luckily, Team Onetrip had all their bases covered and gave us sunscreen. The next stop was a field full of rice noodle sheets drying out in the heat of the sun on makeshift bamboo racks. We walked out into the fields to admire the handmade process up close. One of the guides ripped tiny pieces of rice paper and fed it to us. It had this slight acidic bite to it and quite chewy. We crossed the street to the one room noodle factory that would later process these sheets of rice paper into hủ tiếu (thin rice noodle,) the most common noodle dish eaten in Southern Vietnam. The factory was pretty meager but demonstrated the industriousness of the Vietnamese. I was definitely impressed!

Cu Chi Adventure Tunnels

No preservatives added, all natural!

After our noodle stop, the guides went off-roading, rerouting the journey through the countryside. The dirt path followed a small stream that snaked through paddy fields. Conscientious of the heat and of our bums getting sore, we took a “butt-break” at a cafe, chilling out on the hammocks. A glass of passion fruit juice and plates of chopped guava paired with a chili/salt/sugar dip kept my hunger at bay.

Cu Chi Adventure Tunnels

The sap coming out from the tree is the latex used to make natural rubber

By now, it was already 11 am. We had one more stop before reaching Cu Chi and that was the rubber plantation. Thin trees lined up in rows alerted us we had arrived. Strapped onto the trunk were wooden collection bowls. One of the guides, Hieu, cut into the tree with his pocket knife. From the puncture, we could see the white sap oozing out, natural latex used to produce rubber. I placed my hand in the milky substance, which basically had the consistency of glue. After some historical background, we departed with more trivia about Vietnam than we possibly ever expected.

Cu Chi Tunnels Adventure

Gettin’ ready to do some exploring!

It was now time for the tunnels. Thirty minutes later, we had arrived at Ben Duoc. It’s kind of crazy to think that the Cu Chi District still technically belongs to Ho Chi Minh City. A 70-km drive out of the city, Ben Duoc is one of the two tunnel entrances. Most tourists are brought to Ben Dinh because of its closer proximity to Saigon and its reconstructed tunnels that have been enlarged to accommodate visitors bigger in size. While Ben Duoc is further away, traveling the extra kilometers awards the visitor almost an exclusive experience and access to the original tunnel system; this is where the Vietnamese actually go to pay respect to the veterans during the national holidays. When we arrived, only one other party was there.

Cu Chi Adventure Tunnels

The landscape is permanently scarred by the level of destruction eacted by these bombs

The sites are installed with historical displays including a collection of artillery used in the Vietnam War, known as the American War of Aggression by the Vietnamese. B-52 craters shape the terrain. Mannequins and animatronic figures dressed in Viet Cong uniforms previewed life in the past. It’s obvious how much of an investment the government has made preserving the tunnels. As we walked through the tree-covered area, our guides were fast to remark:

These trees were planted by the government because after the devastation, there wasn’t a tree in sight!

After a quick look at a propaganda video, we were on our way to exploring the tunnels. Our guides, all history buffs, took turns sharing facts about Cu Chi. We were then asked to find the entrance to the tunnels. While people scoured the horizon, one of the dudes, Long, bent down and unearthed a secret door in the ground, hidden by leaves. The rectangular hole was basically the size of shoebox! Long sat down, raised his arms, and disappeared into the expanse. All the rest of us were hesitant to follow, fearful that we’d get stuck but in the end, after much persuasion, one-by-one vanished down below. The hole led into a tiny tunnel, made of dirt. The Viet Cong had dug all these tunnels by hand using crude hand tools. It was impossible not to get dirty. Crouched in squat position, six of us made our way down the tunnel shimmying more so than crawling.

Cu Chi Adventure Tunnels

The bunker was tinyyyy and super musty but it had a well inside of it!

A light to our left beckoned us to the exit. Immediately, we made our way out feeling accomplished. “Now that was Level 1.” Level 1. Ten meters long. Two more challenges were awaiting us. Level 2, about 20 meters, sunk deeper into the earth. You basically slide down a bit before making your descent to an underground bunker. We all were amazed at the size of the bunker, outfitted with a tiny light bulb. In the left was a well, showing us a small example of how the Viet Cong managed to survive down there. Making our way out, we complained of soreness in our legs, laughing how out of shape we all were to be doing such “strenuous” exercising.

Cu Chi Tunnels Adventure

Ready to make the 2 hour trip BACK to HCMC… lucky I had a seat back to lean on!

The last installment of our tunnel escapades was either a 30-meter or 50-meter route. We went with the latter. The tunnels, having no light, meant that cellphone flashlights had to be switched on. As we crouched through the low-lying tunnels, our hot breaths filled the tunnels. It was no secret how difficult life must have been down below for the Viet Cong, even with basic amenities at their disposal. An estimated 45,000 Vietnamese men and women died defending this region. The exit to the 50-meter tunnel was the hardest to exit out of. Basically, the tunnel abruptly stopped to a seemingly tiny hole and you had to essentially wiggle your way into the hole and then prop yourself up to get through the exit. But high fives were waiting for us at the end. The guides then directed us to a water fountain to rinse up and then we proceeded to munch on cut up cassava, the central starch that formed the diet of the Viet Cong during the war. By now, all our stomachs were grumbling.

There is also a shooting range at Ben Duoc located near the exit but we were all too hungry to focus on anything else. The lunch point, Gì 7 meaning “Aunty Seven,” was only 15 minutes away thankfully and it was probably one of the best meals I had in my life. About 7 dishes were laid out with bowls of hot rice. Tofu stuffed with pork, sauteed morning glory with garlic, VFC (short for Vietnamese Fried Chicken) were some of the meals we enjoyed. Lunch was eaten in complete silence. The only interruption was due to the arrival of a cake for Julie’s birthday that Tri had called ahead to prepare. It was the absolute sweetest gesture! The meal came to a close and we all set forth back to the city, eyes heavy bellies full. Hitting a bit of traffic, we reached the city at 5 pm. The day was long but my spirits were still high.

My Cu Chi experience had been fully redeemed by the Onetrip adventure with Team Christina’s and I can’t thank the crew enough for their dedication to making it the best day possible for my friends and me!

the next somewhere layout

Read more: Onetrip Cu Chi Adventure by Christina’s Saigon
Transportation: Motorbike (car available upon request)
Cost: $79/ppx
Time: Full-day  • 7 am to 5 pm (10 hours)
What’s included: A personal tour guide, transportation, breakfast & lunch, water

watchnow-explore

Do you have a place for me to discover? Comment below! xoxo Izzy

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save


Izzy Pulido is a Bostonian by way of the Philippines who loves to vagabond. At twenty-six, expat life has opened the door to full-time travel writing. She lives for good times, good food, and good peeps. When she's not writing at her computer, she's probably out on the dance floor getting down with her bad self.

RELATED POST

  1. Thuc

    21 September

    This is an awesome read!

  2. Amanda Williams

    21 September

    The thought of squeezing in to those tiny tunnels makes me feel the fear! I can’t begin to imagine what it must have been like for the men that used them during the war or how long they took to dig by hand.

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      They showed us the crude tools they used, it was basically a handheld gardening ho. And to think this network of tunnels is hundreds of kilometers long!

  3. Patricia

    21 September

    Wow! First, it looks like Julie had an incredible birthday (many good belated birthday wishes to her!). Second, the whole trip looks like quite an experience. Those tunnels really do look tiny. I can’t imagine using them during a war. Kudos to you all for taking on the adventure!

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      Under wartime conditions, I feel like it would’ve been an absolute nightmare down there with no lights and bombs exploding almost 24/7!

  4. Joella (RovingJo)

    22 September

    Let me tell you this is not what I expected. I am originally from Venezuela and in the Spanish from my country the word cuchi means cute. I thought for sure this was about some cute adventure – LOL. But it turns out this was a great adventure and I love how it all started with the motorcycles and what a great group to do the adventure with.

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      Haha well in the American English, the word Cu Chi sounds a lot like the word coochie which is slang for a woma’s you-know-what 😛 I love the being lost in translation moments! But it was cute because those Onetrip guides were super adorable 🙂

  5. Candy

    22 September

    Wow! What an exciting tour! I don’t even remember the last time I was on a motorcycle, so that alone would have been exciting for me. To be able to go on a tour where you actually crawl through the same tunnel is something I have never heard of. Such a great read. Thanks for sharing! 🙂

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      I honestly think I loved the motorbike aspect most about the trip except when I got sleepy and had no way to fall asleep without fear of
      falling off!

  6. Mimi

    22 September

    Man did this like 3 years ago! Miss Vietnam a lot and cu chi was fun! Actually going back for a visit in 3 weeks, exciteeeed

  7. Vyjay

    22 September

    The tunnels sound exciting. But if it is too long in the narrow and dark confines of the tunnel, I would feel claustrophobic.. The rubber plantation is a very fascinating aspect that I would love to see some day.

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      This would be a claustrophobic’s fears come to life. But I really like what an immersive experience it was!

  8. Lindsay

    22 September

    My trip to the Cu Chi tunnels was also missing a little ‘something’. This trip looks much much better and that meal looks AMAZING!! If I ever make it back to HCM, I’ll definitely look them up. As usual, another great post with some fab photos 😉

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      Thank you so much Lindsay! Yeah, I was soooo disappointed by that first experience so it was a real nice surprise! Definitely look them up!

  9. Megan Jerrard

    22 September

    Wow what a day, thankyou for taking us with you through your photos and words. Ben Duoc being further away wouldn’t have been off putting for me either – I gladly travel the extra mile for a more authentic experience, and where possible to avoid the tourist crowds. Amazing that you had almost an exclusive experience and access to the original tunnel system. I can’t even imagine how difficult life would have been during the war 🙁

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      Aww thank you for your awesome comment! Most tour agents get lazy and take the tourists to Ben Dinh and a lot of the time, tourists don’t realize there are two entrance sites! I never though about how exclusive it is to have been the only people really visiting that day in the actual original tunnel systems! That just made me feel more thankful for the opportunity!

  10. Gina

    22 September

    I always love reading about the history of countries and their relationship to America. I saw the hospital cave on Cat Ba and I was amazed by all the hard work the Vietnamese put into it. I would actually be a bit afraid to check out the tunnels. I would not be afraid to eat all the delicious food though!

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      It’s so important to know your history especially if you want to be a mindful traveler. I have to go visit this hospital cave when I go to Cat Ba! 🙂

  11. Such a fun way to explore! I tried to do this in Thailand but my scooter skills were definitely lacking! Eating genuine Vietnamese food is on my must-eat list.

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      People always try to tell me scootering is easy-peasy but I feel like I lack to focus and gentle touch needed to work a sensitive beast like that of a motorbike!

  12. That tunnel looks like an AWESOME way to explore! I’d love to visit! Eating all that delicious looking Viet food is high on my list as well. Great post! Will definitely do when I visit Vietnam!

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      Vietnamese food is hands down the best across Southeast Asia. I love how fresh and vibrant it is!

  13. Alla Ponomareva

    24 September

    Wow, that looks so narrow and small and completely claustrophobic! Happy Birthday to Julie, who is apparently a mutual friend (we both exhibited in a DJAC show here in Daejeon). What a small world! and small tunnels! btw they probably discriminate against some larger people, right?

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      You did art with Julie?? Such a small world! I will forward her hte love! Hahah no anyone can go down there, it’s to their own discretion however! 😛

  14. Wendy

    26 September

    Early part… “I could bring my kids here smfor the rich historical stuff”

    Middle part… “No… They will suffocate”

    Last part… Fooooood! Beautiful and appetizing! And that’s all that matters:-)

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      HAHAH I love this break down!! This is sooo cute! They won’t suffocate, they would probably love running around like tunnel rats! Kids need to be outdoors (or underground) more 😛

  15. Star Lengas

    26 September

    Wow that sounds like an intense adventure. I’m not familiar with the Vietnamese history of the war, so this was very interesting. I would definitely be interested in taking part if we ever visit Vietnam. How was it riding on the motorcycles for such a long period of time? I heard the driving in Vietnam is nerve wrenching.

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      Driving in Vietnam is a different beast for sure but I’m used to it because its the only mode of transportation we have! A motobike taxi is like 50 cents for two miles compared to $1.50 for the same distance in a taxi. But yea, my bum was soooo sore the day after and my lower back was feeling the burn too!

  16. You are way more brave than I am! You’ve combined two of my biggest fears: small, enclosed spaces, and motorbiking in Asia! The food would be the only thing helping me out. A light at the end of the tunnel, if you will LOL

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      Hahah love the pun! I actually wasn’t the driver so it was totally fine! Motorbiking as a passenger is way more fun I think cause you get to soak it all in!

  17. Don Macdonell

    26 September

    Those tunnels are super interesting. I would never fit through the tunnel entrance!!!

    • Izzy Pulido

      26 September

      You’d be surprise! They are a lot bigger than what is pictured!

  18. […] The Vietnam Bucket List Meet Laura Nalin, Travel Blogger Top 5 Things To Do in Phnom Penh,… Cu Chi Adventure: A Day Trip to The… Top Five Things To Do in Melbourne, Australia August in Review The Blog Turns One! Want To […]

  19. Frances

    24 October

    We did a trip to Cu Chi last week and were similarly disenchanted by the whole experience. It was so rushed and I came away feeling a bit let down by the hype of it as a must see Saigon attraction. But I guess you get what you pay for and your trip sounded amazing and well worth the cost! I came away sure I’d never want to visit again but you’ve given me a new perspective and I’ll be sure to book with OneTrip the next time someone visits us here!

  20. […] an infinity pool, it’s the very definition of paradise. I learned about them when I went on a Onetrip adventure to the Cu Chi tunnels. Onetrip is the tour company they also run, which has tours to the My Son Sanctuary and a secret […]

  21. […] taken 16 flights throughout the year, visiting 15 destinations including Ho Chi Minh City, Mui Ne, Cu Chi, Ninh Binh, Hanoi, Hoi An, Vung Tau, Can Tho, Manila, Tagaytay, Puerto Princesa, El Nido, […]

  22. […] Cu Chi Adventure: A Day Trip To The Cu Chi Tunnels on Thenextsomewhere.com […]

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

INSTAGRAM
FOLLOW THENEXTSOMEWHERE